Thursday, November 6, 2014

The Prettiest Color Of Fall

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Yesterday the Sous Chef and I  took a walk around the neighborhood and went no farther than this.  I turned around, ran back to the house and got my camera.  Then I knocked on the owner's house and asked the name.  Needless to say,the Sous Chef was mighty annoyed that we had interrupted our walk to ask about "a dumb bush".



Maybe some of you are familiar with it, but for those of us who are not, it is called a Burning Bush or Euonymus alatus and is native to central and northern China, Japan, and Korea. 

The flowers are greenish, borne over a long period in the spring. The fruit is a red aril enclosed by a four-lobed pink, yellow or orange capsule.
The common name "burning bush" comes from the bright red fall color.
It is a popular ornamental plant in gardens and parks due to its bright pink or orange fruit and attractive fall color. The species and the cultivar 'Compactus' have both gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.
Not everything is positive about this plant.  It  is also an invasive species of woodlands in eastern North America, and its importation and sale is prohibited in the states of Massachusetts and New Hampshire
E. alatus is used in traditional Chinese medicine to promote blood stasis to promote menstruation, remove toxic materials, subside swelling, and kill insects or parasites. Wikipedia

That should cover your basic needs...




Some of you may remember the name as an object described by the Book of Exodus as being located on Mount Horeb; according to the narrative, the bush was on fire, but was not consumed by the flames, hence the name. In the narrative, the burning bush is the location at which Moses was appointed by Yahweh (God) to lead the Israelites out of Egypt and into Canaan.
As a powerful religious symbol, the burning bush represents many things to JewsChristians and Muslims such as God's miraculous energy, sacred light, illumination, and the burning heart of purity, love and clarity. From a human standpoint, it also represents Moses' reverence and fear before the divine presence.
The Hebrew word used in the narrative, that is translated into English as bush, is seneh (סנה), which refers in particular to bramblesseneh is a biblical dis legomenon, only appearing in two places, both of which describe the burning bush. It is possible that the reference to a burning bush is based on a mistaken interpretation of Sinai (סיני), a mountain described by the Bible as being on fire.  - Wikipedia




What stopped me on my tracks was not only the color, but the berries as well.










I did ask...

After a couple of days, the berries start to drop off but the color is so pretty it's worth picking them up.  After weighing the pros and cons, I decided it was easier to knock on my neighbor's door once a year and cut a couple of branches for my vase.  The alternative was not very appealing.

15 comments:

  1. Keep telling you we live in Oz, so start dreamin' and get those red shoes��.

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  2. My goodness, a more dazzling autumnal plant I've yet to see! This is magnificent in all it's fiery glory. I too would have stopped in my tracks at the sight of it. I am not familiar with this particular plant and I'm happy you shared it with your fortunate readers so that they too might covet a few of those branches for their vases.

    Currently in my garden a large Pittosporum tree is loaded with orange berries about to burst. The birds will make a feast of it to be certain.

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    1. So glad you used the word fiery. It finally reminded me of the name of this particular burning bush that the owner mentioned. It's Fireball!

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  3. We have one at Linderhof -- bought for the fall color -- I guess I never noticed the berries. Ours has not started to turn yet, however, but when it does, branches are coming inside!

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    1. Let me know if yours has berries. Maybe it needs a male and female like in holly. There are two bushes here.

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  4. Wow, I didn't know they are invasive and even banned! We had two up North and they are all over here in N.C. But I don't think I've ever seen one as large as this in your neighborhood. Amazing!! And yes, I'll be the SC wasn't happy about the delay! How is she doing? And how are you doing?

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    1. There's two of them. SC and I taking a walk everyday. she really looks forward to it. Things not so good. Hoping for a miracle.

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  5. Initially from your first picture I thought it was bougainvillea, and in the colour I love the best - we have two pots on one balcony. This (here) is the season for them too. We were lucky enough to see autumn colours on our recent visit to Scotland.

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    1. Bougainvillea is my favorite. Yes, it reminded me of it except instead of flowers, these are the leaves and berries to boot! I have missed you.

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  6. Jeepers, I never thought this post would be so popular! Six comments before midnight is a record for me. Glad you enjoyed it.

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  7. Well no wonder it's so popular. That's one spectacular bush. We have them in NC, but I've never seen one that large. I would definitely stop and ask for some branches each year.
    Sam

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    1. A much better alternative seeing that I have planted so much in my yard there isn't a spot left for the SC to pee!

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  8. That bush is extraordinary, as is your arrangement in that vase (a skill I utterly lack). I hope, however, that people aren't too anxious to plant a shrub that has tendencies towards invasiveness. It's strange how these invasive plants (and animals, for that matter) often seem to behave themselves for a while, then suddenly they're out of control. By the way, I checked to see if the berries are edible, but it seems not.
    --Jim

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    1. Jim, thanks but I just plopped them in. Can you imagine a burning bush crisp a la mode???

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